Using the full width of your wrap

Using the full width of your wrap

Using the full width of your wrap – a quick fix to obtain maximum support.

I’ve said it before, but I’ll say it again – woven wraps are so versatile that you can use them from newborn to whenever you want. Although they are “one size fits all”, there is a certain amount of adjustment to make to use them with different sizes of children.

One of the most common problems that people come to see me about is the top rail working loose in a front wrap cross carry (FWCC), and not providing enough support.

So what can be done to remedy this? Whatever size your child is, you will find the weight is distributed more evenly and you will gain maximum support if you use the full width of your wrap.

What does this mean in real terms? To illustrate this, I’ve used a newborn doll lying on a wrap so you can see clearly what I mean.

Here’s a “newborn” in the middle of a woven wrap.

Baby in the middle of a wrap

Baby in the middle of a wrap

Obviously, there is too much fabric at the top and the bottom, so we need to deal with this, but this fabric plays a big part in distributing the weight.

Full width gathered

Baby in the middle with excess wrap gathered

When you pull the wrap up to cover your baby’s back and shoulders, pull it up until it’s level with the top of the head then fold it back. If you gently gather the excess fabric behind your baby’s neck, and tuck up the excess wrap under the bum, the centre of the wrap is still supporting the weight of your baby, but the gathered wrap at the top and bottom is adding extra support to spread the weight. Using the full width of the wrap also adds stability to the carry – perfect for leaners!

So what happens if you don’t use all the wrap?

Baby at the top of a woven wrap

Baby at the top of a woven wrap

Bottom of wrap gathered under bum

Bottom of wrap gathered under bum

Here’s the baby with the top rail level with the neck. Less than half the width of the wrap will be supporting the weight! All of the weight of the baby will be supported by to top of the wrap, meaning that the weight is concentrated in a narrow band of fabric rather than spread throughout the whole width. As well as providing less support for the baby, it may create pressure points on your shoulders. Half of the wrap is sitting under the bum , not contributing much support at all!

The next time you’re wrapping a front wrap cross carry, take a moment to check your wrap – make sure you have some excess at the top and the bottom of your child’s torso. Your little one and your shoulders will thank you for it!

I’m Susan – wife, mother, and baby sling consultant with ShowMe Slings in Edinburgh. In a previous life I was a scientist, so you’ll often find me reading research and generally geeking out about all things sling! You can take the girl out of science, but you can’t take the science out of the girl 😉